Lee Friedlander

by Sunday, October 1, 2017

Born in 1934, Lee Friedlander began photographing the American social landscape in 1948. With an ability to organize a vast amount of visual information in dynamic compositions, Friedlander has made humorous and poignant images among the chaos of city life, dense landscape and countless other subjects. Friedlander is also recognized for a group of self-portraits he began in the 1960s, reproduced in Self Portrait, an exploration that he turned to again in the late 1990s, and published in a monograph by Fraenkel Gallery in 2000. Friedlander’s work was included in the highly influential 1967 New Documents exhibition, curated by John Szarkowski at the Museum of Modern Art. Included among the many monographs designed and published by Friedlander himself are Sticks and Stones, Lee Friedlander: Photographs, Letters From the People, Apples and Olives, Cherry Blossom Time in Japan, Family, and At Work. In 2005, Friedlander was the recipient of the prestigious Hasselblad Award as well as the subject of a major traveling retrospective and catalog organized by the Museum of Modern Art. In 2010, the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York exhibited the entirety of his body of work, America by Car.

In the 1960s Friedlander emerged, along with Garry Winogrand and Diane Arbus, as part of a generation of street photographers, using a “snapshot aesthetic” to capture contemporary urban life with unflinching realism. Friedlander took black-and-white pictures with a Leica 35-mm camera. From the start, he used reflections in storefront windows, plate-glass doors, and side-view mirrors to complicate the viewing experience. He also incorporated street signs, doors, and windows as framing devices. One of his best-known photographs, New York City (1963; sometimes called Revolving Door), shows a man and a woman walking toward one another through two different revolving doors. Friedlander photographed them from outside a glass door, introducing yet another reflective surface and set of frames. The deliberate fragmentation and ambiguity of his compositions became Friedlander’s trademark. He photographed the same cities, streets, and types of scenes over and over again, leading critics to draw comparisons to the turn-of-the-century Parisian photographer Eugène Atget.

In the tradition of his predecessors Robert Frank and Walker Evans, Friedlander took frequent road trips throughout the United States, and the people and places he saw on those trips became his primary source material. In 1962–63 he photographed the small televisions that were becoming ubiquitous in houses and motels throughout the country. The photographs are named by the city in which they were taken and include no people, just televisions left on in empty rooms. In 1963 Harper’s Bazaar published the series alongside an essay by Evans, in which he praised Friedlander’s work. That same year Friedlander had his first solo exhibition at the International Museum of Photography at George Eastman House in Rochester, New York.

Friedlander’s major break occurred in 1967 when John Szarkowski, scholar and curator at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City, included him in the groundbreaking exhibition “New Documents.” That exhibition acknowledged a new brand of documentary photography that celebrated the specific point of view of the photographer. Thirty of Friedlander’s photographs, many of which were street scenes, were exhibited alongside those by Winogrand and Arbus. The exhibition catapulted the careers of all three photographers.

Friedlander was particularly well known for his self-portraits, which he created throughout his career. Self-Portrait was his first publication. Printed in 1970 by the photographer’s own firm, Haywire Press, the photo book included nearly 50 images of the artist represented as a shadow or a reflection, or occasionally as visible in person. By inserting himself into photographs in indirect ways, Friedlander defied the basic rule of never letting the photographer’s shadow or reflection disrupt the composition. In 2011 he published another book of self-portraits, In the Picture: Self-Portraits, 1958–2011, that time including more than 350 images.

 

 

Among the many photo books Friedlander issued in the 20th century were The American Monument (1976), a series of some 100 monuments to American heroes and historical figures, and Factory Valleys: Ohio and Pennsylvania (1982), a commission by the Akron Art Museum to document industrial sites and workers in the Ohio River valley. He also photographed landscapes, nudes, and portraits, issuing books such as Flowers and Trees (1981), Portraits (1985), Cherry Blossom Time in Japan (1986), and Nudes (1991). In the 1990s Friedlander switched from a Leica to a square-format Hasselblad Superwide camera, which heightened the detail and produced very sharp images. The wide-angle lens was more suitable to the photographs he began taking of the vast landscapes of the American West and Southwest, such as those published in The Desert Seen (1996), a series on the Sonoran Desert.

In 2000 MoMA acquired 1,000 prints by Friedlander, their largest acquisition of work by any living photographer. Five years later they staged a retrospective comprising nearly 500 photographs, spanning his entire career. In 2010 the Whitney Museum of American Art held the exhibition “America by Car,” a collection of 192 images taken by Friedlander from his car over the preceding decade. Among his numerous awards and honours were three Guggenheim fellowships (1960, 1962, and 1977), four grants from the National Endowment for the Arts (1977, 1978, 1979, and 1980), an Edward MacDowell Medal (1986), French Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters (1999), a MacArthur Foundation “genius grant” (1990), and a Hasselblad Foundation International Award in Photography (2005).

 

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