Gael Davrinche

by Wednesday, June 27, 2012

After several appearances in group shows such as Speed ​​Painting in 2010, Gael Davrinche is presenting his recent works of unpublished paintings and large format drawings. A graduate of des Beaux-Arts de Paris in 2000, Gael Davrinche is primarily concerned with a mode of “uneducated” expression, spontaneous, without artifice, borrowed from the representational work of children. Early on, he sought to revisit and reinterpret the works of the great masters, between irreverence and homage to works such as Las Meninas by Velasquez, The Girl with a Pearl Earring by Vermeer. The artist had the audacity to take the Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci through a series of seven canvases in which Mona Lisa is desecrated to the point of a scrawl, along with the words “SALE”, or worse LCKCIR, a nod to Marcel Duchamp.

The artist explains that “by taking famous works, I release myself from the subject, so as not to let it override the paint, putting itself in play and treating it as equal to a medium. Questions of Reincarnation in space and time are then asked.”

Through the decisive gesture of painting, Gael Davrinche questions the portrait, its historical and social significance, its real and imaginary purpose. He combines amazing accessories to his figures, boxing gloves or a tossed pot of peonies, and offers an interpretation quite incongruous to that of a portrait. His works take a strange turn, destabilize us with the ubiquity of the object and, more broadly, become a question of the individual over his role, his attitude, his relationship with the world and others.

Finally, Gael Davrinche surprises us with a series of flowers, withered, whose petals seem ready to fall at the slightest breath of air. Painted or drawn very large such as “flower portraits”, they offer a metaphorical vision of life. The artist sees them as symbols of renewal, of change. It is not for him paint the despair of a nature almost dead but to question the revival to come of it.

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Gael Davrinche

by Wednesday, June 27, 2012

After several appearances in group shows such as Speed ​​Painting in 2010, Gael Davrinche is presenting his recent works of unpublished paintings and large format drawings. A graduate of des Beaux-Arts de Paris in 2000, Gael Davrinche is primarily concerned with a mode of “uneducated” expression, spontaneous, without artifice, borrowed from the representational work of children. Early on, he sought to revisit and reinterpret the works of the great masters, between irreverence and homage to works such as Las Meninas by Velasquez, The Girl with a Pearl Earring by Vermeer. The artist had the audacity to take the Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci through a series of seven canvases in which Mona Lisa is desecrated to the point of a scrawl, along with the words “SALE”, or worse LCKCIR, a nod to Marcel Duchamp.

The artist explains that “by taking famous works, I release myself from the subject, so as not to let it override the paint, putting itself in play and treating it as equal to a medium. Questions of Reincarnation in space and time are then asked.”

Through the decisive gesture of painting, Gael Davrinche questions the portrait, its historical and social significance, its real and imaginary purpose. He combines amazing accessories to his figures, boxing gloves or a tossed pot of peonies, and offers an interpretation quite incongruous to that of a portrait. His works take a strange turn, destabilize us with the ubiquity of the object and, more broadly, become a question of the individual over his role, his attitude, his relationship with the world and others.

Finally, Gael Davrinche surprises us with a series of flowers, withered, whose petals seem ready to fall at the slightest breath of air. Painted or drawn very large such as “flower portraits”, they offer a metaphorical vision of life. The artist sees them as symbols of renewal, of change. It is not for him paint the despair of a nature almost dead but to question the revival to come of it.

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